Who is responsible for transferable skills and how can RRI and Open Science help?

September 5, 2020 12:00 - 1:30

About

Research culture consists of the norms, activities, ethics and integrity that define the behaviour of researchers. Research culture has a profound influence on how Early Career Researchers (ECRs) develop during their research careers, present their work and interact with other researchers and the rest of society. The emerging Open Science era will redefine the basic research culture, so that engagement between researchers and society is placed at the heart of research work.
The Open Science Career Assessment Matrix (OS-CAM) was developed to provide institutions/funding agencies with a tool to evaluate researchers through the lens of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) and Open Science. This session examines the OS-CAM from the point of view of how RRI/Open Science activities enable ECRs to engage with society by developing their communication skills, interacting with stakeholders, publishing open source code, writing data management plans, sharing their datasets through repositories and so on.
The future generation of researchers must learn to speak the language of “Open Science & RRI” and apply it in their daily work. Lack of consensus remains over whose responsibility it is to teach these skills.
This session will promote the interaction between the audience and a panel of experts, who will discuss how RRI/Open Science can help ECRs to develop transferable skills that directly enhance their intersectoral career mobility. This session is supported by the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (MSCA) Social Lab of the New HoRRIzon Project that has enabled stakeholders in the MSCA to examine how RRI/Open Science activities affect the career development of ECRs. The panel includes several young researchers from Eurodoc and EuroScience, who are active participants in the policy debate surrounding researcher career development, public engagement, open science and gender equality.

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